AP Computer Science Principles

Learn all about the course and exam.

About the Assessment

The AP Computer Science Principles assessment has two parts: two performance tasks—which you’ll complete over the course of the year and submit online for scoring through the AP Digital Portfolio—and the end-of-course AP Exam. All measure your proficiency in and grasp of the course practices and content, and all contribute to your final AP score on a scale of 1–5.

Assessment Dates

Assessment Components

For this part of the assessment, you’ll develop a computer program of your choice: one that solves a problem, enables an innovation, or helps you express personal interests.

You’ll be given a minimum of 12 hours of class time to complete the task. You’ll submit these items through the AP Digital Portfolio application for scoring:

  • A video of your program running
  • Individual written responses about your program and development process
  • Program code

For this part of the assessment, you’ll identify a computing innovation, explore its impact, and create a related digital artifact.

You’ll be given a minimum of 8 hours of class time to complete the task. You’ll submit these items through the AP Digital Portfolio application for scoring:

  • A computational artifact (for example, digital art, a video, a presentation, a program)
  • Individual written responses about your exploration and artifact

~74 multiple-choice questions 2hrs 60% of Score

The end-of-course AP Exam is a paper-and-pencil written exam. It contains two types of multiple-choice questions:

  • Single-select multiple-choice: You select 1 answer from among 4 options
  • Multiple-select multiple-choice: You select 2 answers from among 4 options

How We Score Your Work

The two performance tasks, like the end-of-course exam given in May, are scored by the College Board. The scoring is done by trained, experienced educators called AP readers.

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